2/23/13 walk through laev garden part 1

suzi, thiago, nichole, george, shaun - visitor fr. France and carol - begin walk through gardens in front of 117 Bimini.  George suggested more consistent watering for trees, plus prune apple, remove or graft onto olive.  Other suggestions: thin banana plantings; encourage more growth next to fence; more space between them and apple.

George noted that mango has begun to thrive after josh took over it's care.
George noted that mango has begun to thrive after josh took over it’s care.

Throughout the walk myrtle was observed encroaching on other plants and the building.Maybe that's why,   Greco-Romans used myrtle as an emblem of love. (wikipedia)

Throughout the walk myrtle was observed encroaching on other plants and the building.
Maybe that’s why Greco-Romans used myrtle as an emblem of love. (wikipedia)

pittosporum in clutches of myrtle The flowers are small, white and similar in shape to those of the Orange tree, so it is sometimes called mock orange.
pittosporum in clutches of myrtle The p. flowers are small, white and similar in shape to those of the Orange tree, so it is sometimes called mock orange.

George observed that quince needs pruning.

George observed that quince needs pruning.

IMG_3747

mexican “sage” one of several plants intruding on public sidewalk.  Prune, maybe re-locate.

peach - branches extend over fence; and lure passers-by into picking fruit and often breaking branches. Recommend prune back fr. fence; remove compost pile next to trunk; think about replacing tree as it's getting old.

peach – branches extend over fence; and lure passers-by into picking fruit and often breaking branches. Recommend prune back fr. fence; remove compost pile next to trunk; think about replacing tree as it’s getting old.

mandarin

mandarin

pomegranate

pomegranate

background: almond (pink flowers) -not bearing; foreground - fig

background: almond (pink flowers) -not bearing, bark split; foreground – fig.  There’s a smutty  orange tree in there someplace; oranges don’t ripen.

olive tree supports grape vine;olive tree supports grape vine;

North side 117 bimini

Agave in trash can area overflowing into path.

Myrtle encroaching on apricots, nectarines.

Watering challenge in this area due to run-off.

live oaks - proximity to bldg --> concern about effect of roots on foundation as it grows

potential planting space north wall.

potential planting space north wall.

more live oaks (& a dead one).  Large live oak in background is 8 feet from foundation.
more live oaks (& a dead one). Large live oak in background is 8 feet from foundation.

Courtyard

We were getting tired, so just noted that many plantings in need of systematic watering here; plantings in pomegranate area heavily infested with aphids; myrtle needs taming; plum needs re-evaluating – hope it perks up when greywater re-connected; 2 nectarines and apricot aren’t producing; may be able to graft onto apricot as it is very hardy stock. Peach seems to be OK.

The “nightshade tree” is rubbing against the roof tiles.

Many, many thanks to George for generously sharing his time, gardening and landscaping knowledge and familiarity with LAEV gardens.

4 thoughts on “2/23/13 walk through laev garden part 1

  1. We plum tree adjacent neighbors are concerned that having the greywater “hooked up” without knowing and using best practices may have been the reason the plum tree got sad to begin with. The greywater was disconnected only recently and the tree was not happy for quite some time before that. We plan to hook it back up when we have the appropriate soap and methods and try to evaluate whether other non-soap biomatter that goes down the drain is also potentially harmful. This system is only connected to the kitchen sink- which brings with it questions of food particles and other food “run off” contamination.

  2. Great photos and caption report Carol.

    Here are some comments:

    Myrtles front and courtyard:
    They were decorative shrubbery when CRSP first bought the building in 1996. I recommend we trim them way back and/or eventually replace them with food
    bearing trees. Same for pittosporum.

    Quince:
    The idea of it is great. But in all of its life, I’ve never known anyone to use the quince. If there is no interest in the poor thing, let’s give it to someone who can care for and appreciate it.

    Mexican sage:
    So beautiful near our entrance. I’d like to see it trimmed, but not removed.

    Peach and/or any other tree whose branches extend over fence:
    When we did initial plantings of many of our fruit trees, including the fruit trees in the public parkways, the idea was to share their food with the public. City regulation says that any edible food growing from private property onto the public right of way is legal for anyone to pick. I like that. And I like that we have the opportunity to engage with the public when we’re out and about and observe them picking a fruit or two. We have learned many interesting things from people walking by and stopping to pick a fruit or a green. So I would not want to protect our edibles from the public, but rather encourage more engagement with them. Of course, when people are abusive, there are NVC ways to deal with that. In years past, I have also learned that signage is helpful, e.g., in 2 or 3 languages, “Please get permission to pick fruit. Thank you.”

    Pomegranate:
    I feel badly that we didn’t prune the pomegranate before it started to turn green a week or two ago. My understanding of them is that they should only have a few main trunk branches, not dozens. Here’s an informative website on pomegranates:
    http://www.sdedible.org/pomegranate-trees.html

    Almond:
    Would be great to learn if its salvageable and could be a good bearer. I’ve never actually gotten an almond from it, but Lara says she has.

    Olive:
    I believe it is a non-bearing olive. Someday, maybe olive trees that bear olives???

    North side 117 Bimini:
    The pit fruits there are fantastic. Be great to give them more attention.

    Seems like the pathway along the entire north building could use a lot of special attention. Currently it’s also a safety hazard, imo.

    Oaks:
    They are a protected species in LA. So sad to hear about the dead one. Oak roots can be protected from spreading too close to foundation with a root protector. Or we could redevelop the foundation if needed (in the distant future).

    Courtyard:
    Systematic and appropriate watering. Some things may get too much water, and others not enough. Mary Maverick, one of our early founders and garden expert used to try to train our trees and plants to be more drought tolerant.

    Aphids: are pretty easy to control if we are mindful of them. Same with white fly, thrips, and scale. Among our garden group, we should probably have a designated pest control sub-group. Here’s a helpful website:
    http://www.countryfarm-lifestyles.com/natural-pesticides.html

    Plum:
    Note just in northeast courtyard, but the two in front of the Bimini Terrace. At one time all three gave delicious and plentiful harvest. But none has been bearing fruit for several years now. Same with one we had in the lower courtyard. Plum trees may only have a life span of between 10 and 20 years, depending on variety, and I’m not sure which kind we have, so they may have come to the end of their fruit bearing lives. We planted that northeast corner tree probably about 1999, and the ones in front of the Bimini Terrace about the same time, give or take a year or two.

  3. I miss the LAEV in spring. When I lived in that area, I loved looking at your lush garden. Loved wondering what this and that plant was. All those pretty flowers. The purple Jacaranda. I must confess, sometimes I picked a guava or two off your tree. Thank you for the pleasure you have given me.

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