It’s official: LAEV is in Koreatown

Well, there is sometimes some debate about where the boundaries of neighborhoods lie in this city of overlapping ethnicities, immigrant communities, and traffic everywhere, but the LATimes has maps and data about their ‘official’ boundaries, drawn from a questionnaire filled out by thousands of LA residents and LATimes readers:

http://projects.latimes.com/mapping-la/neighborhoods/neighborhood/koreatown/

2 thoughts on “It’s official: LAEV is in Koreatown

  1. Well, that settles it! For now! Neighborhoods, like all great eco-systems, are constantly in flux. Apparently Korean-Amiercans are moving to the suburbs and others are moving in, including Bangladeshis, and folks from Central America, and even hipsters, and eco-villagers!

    In the 2000 census (I will get the book where I got this from and make sure I am remembering it correctly), in terms of who lives here, Koreatown was something like 35% Korean and something like 45% Latino. The businesses are more Korean – and Koreans who live in outlying areas (La Crescenta, Palos Verdes, Orange County) come to Koreatown for business. I am curious to see the breakdown of backgrounds from the 2010 census underway.

    Another interesting Koreatown factoid from the LA Times page linked: 42,611 people per square mile, among the highest densities for the city of Los Angeles and among the highest densities for the county.

  2. Sorry to be holding my own discussion here… but I think that the L.A. Times has done something a bit exclusionary. I was checking out the overall map – available here: http://projects.latimes.com/mapping-la/neighborhoods/population/density/neighborhood/list/#koreatown
    and there’s no overlap between their designations – either you’re Koreatown or you’re not.

    It’s classic either/or thinking… probably not particularly applicable to 21st century mapping/thinking (and perhaps, it was never all that applicable), where boundaries/borders are fluid. What’s cool about eco-village’s neighborhood is that it does have this great mix of Korean, Philipino, Oaxacan, Salvadoreño, Bangladeshi, and much more… drawing a firm line between these neighborhoods may be fun, but it is unnecessary and an invitation to be very outdated, very quickly.

    Enjoy the overlap! Enjoy the state of flux! Mull it over while you’re eating a koji taco, pastrami burrito, or one of the many kinds of tortas

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